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Jan12

Fundamentals – Judging Our Tools

by zscott

Zane Scott, Vitech Vice President of Professional Services

The ultimate test of any tool is whether or not it helps the user in the way intended at its acquisition. In other words, “Does it do what we need it to do for us?” This is certainly true for systems engineering tools. To judge their value, we must look first and foremost to their performance against our needs.  More...

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Categories: CORE Software | GENESYS | MBSE

Jan05

Looking forward while remembering the past

by mrich

David Long, then director of product development, tends to matters at the Vitech booth at the National Council of Systems Engineering in St. Louis in 1995.

 

Miriam Rich, Vitech Marketing & Communications Manager

This is Part I in an occasional series on the history of Vitech Corporation.

As a new year opens, Vitech Corporation anticipates celebrating a significant milestone: 25 years in business. It’s been a quarter century of growth that has paralleled the growth of systems engineering itself.

But it was a venture that almost didn’t happen. David Long, president of Vitech, founded the company in 1992. The undertaking which began as an undergraduate project has grown to become an enterprise with a product used by thousands across the globe. It all started rather by accident.  More...

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Categories: Misc | Vitech

Dec22

Educating Engineers or Training Technicians?

by zscott

Zane Scott, Vitech Vice President of Professional Services

Those of us engaged in instruction, be it live or web-based, are often asked to provide “practical examples” of the principles and techniques we discuss. There is an intense desire to focus on application and avoid theory or concepts. The examples requested are deemed “practical” to the extent that they resemble the requester’s practice area. Rail system designers seek examples of rail systems. Missile designers want missile systems as examples. This seems practical and focused at first blush, but it disguises an underlying learning/teaching problem.   

The problem is rooted in a struggle to establish a body of knowledge and the corresponding theoretical foundations of a systems engineering discipline. The history of the practice of systems engineering makes this struggle all the more difficult. Systems engineering arose in response to the need in the military/aerospace (mil/aero) sector for dealing with increasingly more complex problems and solutions in a rigorous and disciplined way. As the problem set began to demand solutions that crossed disciplinary boundaries, the need for an organized, comprehensive approach to designing and managing these solutions increased dramatically. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the arms and space races of the Cold War era. More...

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Categories: Misc

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