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Feb02

Mission Engineering Analysis in CORE / GENESYS

by rkratzke

By Ron Kratzke, Principal Systems Engineer

Over the past year there has been an increased interest in performing “Mission Engineering” during initial concept development. This has come about for many reasons, one of which is an effort to ensure that subsequent operational and system architectures – and the systems developed to support them – are aligned with and support the missions for which they were designed in the first place. More...

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Categories: CORE Software | GENESYS | MBSE

Oct20

Extending Variant Management to Behavior and Testing Architectures

by rkratzke

By Ron Kratzke, Principal Systems Engineer

In a previous post entitled “Variant Management in an MBSE Environment,” I covered the techniques used in CORE and GENESYS to capture variants in the physical architecture.

In this post, I will cover techniques to capture variants of the behavior architecture and development of testing architectures.

Continuing the example from the previous post, we had two workstation variants, the OS Mac workstation and Windows PC workstation.

 

Let’s assume that the “nominal” workstation had the following behavior: More...

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Categories: CORE Software | GENESYS | MBSE | Tips and Tricks

Aug25

Variant Management in CORE and GENESYS (Part I)

by rkratzke

By Ron Kratzke, Principal Systems Engineer

When teaching classes on model-based systems engineering, I am frequently asked about methods to manage different system configurations in the model. Most engineers are very comfortable thinking in part structures, and while this is a critical aspect of systems engineering, it’s not the whole story. To answer the question and manage variants, we leverage the generalization/kind of relation in parallel with part structures.

Classical systems engineering is concerned with the decomposition of our physical architecture (the bill of materials). In the Component class, this decomposition structure is captured using the parent-child relation built from. A system is built from its subsystems, and those subsystems are built from their constituent parts. An automobile is built from its chassis, drive train, engine, and more. In the Geospatial Library example provided with CORE and GENESYS, the Geospatial Library (the system of interest) is built from the Workstation and Command Center subsystems.

Graphically, the decomposition of the physical architecture is shown in a classic physical hierarchy or a SysML structure block definition diagram (BDD). Both diagrams represent the built from parent-child relation.

 

More...

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Categories: CORE Software | GENESYS | MBSE | Tips and Tricks

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